Timing how long a python script runs

This post introduces several ways to find out how long a python script takes to complete its execution.

  • If you are using Linux or Mac OS, in your terminal
$ time ./your_script.py
  • Several ways to do the task by adding a few lines of code in your py script.
import time
startTime = time.time()

your_func() #python3: print ("It took", time.time() - startTime, "seconds.")

See the following for an example in python 3. 

import time
import functools

startTime = time.time()

print(functools.reduce(lambda x,y: x+y, [47,11,42,13]))

#python3:
print ("It took", time.time() - startTime, "seconds.")

Another way to do the same thing:

from datetime import datetime
startTime = datetime.now()

#do something

#Python 2: 
print datetime.now() - startTime 

#Python 3: 
print(datetime.now() - startTime)

One more way to do the same thing with a nicely formatted output.

import sys
import timeit

startTime = timeit.default_timer()

#do some nice things...

stopTime = timeit.default_timer()
totalRunningTime = stopTime - startTime

# output running time in a nice format.
mins, secs = divmod(totalRunningTime, 60)
hours, mins = divmod(mins, 60)

sys.stdout.write("Total running time: %d:%d:%d.\n" % (hours, mins, secs))

If you want to compare two blocks of code / functions quickly you can do the following:

import timeit

startTime = timeit.default_timer()
your_func1()
#python3
print(timeit.default_timer() - startTime)

startTime2 = timeit.default_timer()
your_func2()
#python3
print(timeit.default_timer() - starTime2)

Dynamic GPU usage monitoring (CUDA)

To dynamically  monitor NVIDIA GPU usage, here I introduce two methods:

method 1: use nvidia-smi

in your terminal, issue the following command:

$ watch -n 1 nvidia-smi

It will continually update the gpu usage info (every second, you can change the 1 to 2 or the time interval you want the usage info to be updated).

method 2: use the open source monitoring program glances with its GPU monitoring plugin

in your terminal, issue the following command to install glances with its GPU monitoring plugin

$ sudo pip install glances[gpu]

to launch it, in your terminal, issue the following command:

 $ sudo glances

Then you should see your GPU usage etc. It also monitors the CPU, disk IO, disk space, network, and a few other things

For more commonly used Linux commands, check my other posts at here  and here .

Get the number of CPUs/cores in Linux from the command line

This post introduces how to find out the number of CPUs/cores on Linux machines from command line.

  • method 1:

$ nproc –all

20   # this means there are 20 cores on the linux machine.

  • method 2:

$ lscpu

CPU(s):                20

On-line CPU(s) list:   0-19

Thread(s) per core:    2

Core(s) per socket:    10